July 24 2014, 02:26 AM

In line for reign/community/teen wolf panels happy comic con

July 23 2014, 09:30 AM
amuseoffyre:

Music I’m playing on my run today: Golden Silvers, Talking Heads, MIA and Paul Simon  (x)

amuseoffyre:

Music I’m playing on my run today: Golden Silvers, Talking Heads, MIA and Paul Simon  (x)

July 23 2014, 03:09 AM

nottootypical:

alltheladiesyouhate:

bi/pan women are not more or less oppressed than lesbian women. they’re differently oppressed. stop promoting the idea that one group is more privileged than the other. situational lack of oppression is not the same thing as privilege.

Reblogging this from myself to add some commentary/ask some questions. What I’m wondering though, if this is true, then how is it that homsexual women get the power to oppress bi and pansexual women (which does happen, don’t even start with me here)? If neither group is more or less oppressed, then where does the former get the societal power that it has over the latter?

First off, I am bisexual.

I used to be of your same opinion, and I do think there is a huge amount of intolerance towards bi/pan people in the LGBTQ community, but I don’t think terming it “oppression” (or saying “monosexual privilege” wrt gay/lesbian people) is fair.

I see lesbian women in particular claim fairly frequently that bisexual people are privileged above them and experience “straight-passing privilege” or similar terms. This has always irritated me because I patently did not feel that way. I felt like lesbian women experienced privilege I did not.

I still think it’s true that there are certain situations in which lesbians are not oppressed where bisexual women are, or vice versa. For example, a bisexual woman in a relationship with a man might be assumed straight. But that’s not a privilege. It’s just a lack of oppression in a specific situation.

I believe now that you cannot be an oppressor on the same axis that oppresses you - which means that neither bisexual>lesbian or lesbian>bisexual oppression can exist, because the two sides of the axis are “straight” and “not straight”. Bisexual doesn’t fall in the middle of the axis. It falls on the “not straight” side, alongside lesbian.

Removing the oppression/privilege rhetoric and terminology when discussing the relationship between bisexual woman and lesbian communities is a necessary step to repairing our broken sense of solidarity.

July 22 2014, 04:07 PM
July 22 2014, 03:53 PM

getting on the road an hour early!!

July 22 2014, 03:52 PM
they need coal for power since they don't have a nuclear district anymore :)

District 5 is electric power though so they still have that!

July 22 2014, 03:42 PM

bleibimmerduselbst:

If the Capitol had all this amazing technology what were they using coal for in the first place?

imo, the coal probably went to the other districts. presumably the grain shipments 12 got were from 11, etc, so not everything goes straight to the capitol. 12’s industry of coal would make them superfluous to the capitol and therefore explain their extreme poverty as well, in comparison to districts 1 and 2 whose industries were primarily useful to the capitol and not the other districts

July 22 2014, 03:40 PM

uuhh biphobia i guess i’m back and forth on actually that can still be a useful word

July 22 2014, 03:35 PM
a-hypothetical-abstract-concept:

washingtonpost:

a-hypothetical-abstract-concept:

washingtonpost:

The essential underwear chart for frequent travelers.

Isn’t this just common sense? Do people really need a chart?

You’d be surprised.

That’s worrying.

i need the chart

a-hypothetical-abstract-concept:

washingtonpost:

a-hypothetical-abstract-concept:

washingtonpost:

The essential underwear chart for frequent travelers.

Isn’t this just common sense? Do people really need a chart?

You’d be surprised.

That’s worrying.

i need the chart

July 22 2014, 03:34 PM

THEQUANTUMQUEER said: if anything, bisexuals face biphobia from both straight people and gay/lesbian monosexuals

mm, my point in this discussion is that i don’t think “biphobia”, “oppression” and “privilege” are the right words to discuss the contention between gay/lesbian people and bi/pan people because they have a connotation of being supported by the institution. I think there’s definitely an intolerance that comes from the LGBTQ community at large, but it’s different than the biphobia that comes from heterosexuals because it’s not institutionalized. if that makes sense?